Emmy Winning Film & Television Production

What our clients say

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Dennis Conner – 4-Time America’s Cup Winner

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Mike Haas, Sr. VP – Open Roads Consulting

This Is What We Were Born To Do...

 

Development:

In this stage, the project's producer finds a story, which may come from a book, play, another film, a true story, original idea, etc. After identifying a theme or underlying message, the producer works with writers to prepare a synopsis. Next they produce a step outline, which breaks the story down into one-paragraph scenes that concentrate on dramatic structure. Then, they prepare a treatment, a 25 to 30 page description of the story, its mood, and characters. This usually has little dialog and stage direction, but often contains drawings that help visualize key points. Another way is to produce a scriptment once a synopsis is produced.

The producer and screenwriter prepare a film pitch, or treatment, and present it to potential financiers. If the pitch is successful, the film receives a "green light", meaning someone offers financial backing: typically a major film studio, film council, or independent investor. The parties involved negotiate a deal and sign contracts. Once all parties have met and the deal has been set, the film may proceed into the pre-production period. By this stage, the film should have a clearly defined marketing strategy and target audience.

Pre-production:

In pre-production, the film is designed and planned. The production company is created and a production office established. The production is storyboarded and visualized with the help of illustrators and concept artists. A production budget is drawn up to plan expenditures for the film.

The producer hires a crew. The nature of the Film, and the budget, determine the size and type of crew used during filmmaking. Many Hollywood blockbusters employ a cast and crew of hundreds, while a low-budget, independent film may be made by a skeleton crew of eight or nine (or fewer).

    * The director is primarily responsible for the storytelling, creative decisions and acting of the film.
    * The assistant director (AD) manages the shooting schedule and logistics of the production, among other tasks. There are several types of AD, each with different responsibilities.
    * The casting director finds actors to fill the parts in the script. This normally requires that actors audition. Lead actors are carefully chosen, often based on the actor's reputation or "star power."
    * The location manager finds and manages film locations. Most pictures are shot in the controllable environment of a studio sound stage but occasionally, outdoor sequences call for filming on location.
    * The production manager manages the production budget and production schedule. They also report, on behalf of the production office, to the studio executives or financiers of the film.
    * The director of photography (DoP) is the cinematographer who supervises the photography of the entire film
   

Production:

In production, the film is created and shot. More crew will be recruited at this stage, such as the property master, script supervisor, assistant directors, stills photographer, picture editor, and sound editors. These are just the most common roles in filmmaking; the production office will be free to create any unique blend of roles to suit the various responsibilities possible during the production of a film.

A typical day's shooting begins with the crew arriving on the set/location by their call time. Actors usually have their own separate call times. Since set construction, dressing and lighting can take many hours or even days, they are often set up in advance.
The grip, electric and production design crews are typically a step ahead of the camera and sound departments: for efficiency's sake, while a scene is being filmed, they are already preparing the next one.

With workdays often lasting 14 or 18 hours in remote locations, film production tends to create a team spirit.

Post-Production:

Here the film is assembled by the film editor. The modern use of video in the filmmaking process has resulted in two workflow variants: one using entirely film, and the other using a mixture of film and video.

Once the picture is locked, the film is passed into the hands of the postproduction supervising sound editor of the sound department to build up the sound track. The voice recordings are synchronised and the final sound mix is created by the re-recording mixer. The sound mix combines dialogue, sound effects, atmos, ADR, walla, foleys and music.

Finally the film is previewed, normally by the target audience, and any feedback may result in further shooting or edits to the film.

 


Services List:

Direct Response
Print Media
Marketing Collateral
Package Design
Television & Radio
Infomercials
Website Design
Film Production 16mm/35mm
Video Production DV/Beta/HD
2D & 3D Animation
Sound Design
Publication Design

Market Planning
Strategic Thinking
New Product Development
Media Planning & Placement
Hispanic Marketing
German Marketing
Copy Writing
Script Writing
Pre-visualizations
Storyboards
Casting

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Looking For:

Scripts submissions for trailer video production. We have now opened new doorways for low, middle and high end production.

Workshops:

GLASS PLATE PRACTICAL SPFX.
Next workshop will cover using varying densities of liquid to create memserizing particles, flowing colors, and other ideas for use in film making.

KEEP THE CAMERA MOVING.                 This advanced workshop will break down dialog scenes, blocking, and how to keep visual interest by moving the camera in the scene.

Contact:

Studios                                                 1865 Summit Avenue Ste. 605        Plano, TX 75074      

Jason Van Sickel, Producer
469.569.1857

info@blackolivemedia.com

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